University of California Davis, Kansas State University, University of Nebraska, Colorado State University, Texas A&M University, North Carolina State University & Cornell University Winning with Wheat

Funded by USDA, the International Wheat Yield Partnership Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP) and its predecessor Triticeae CAP (T-CAP) focused on improving wheat and barley for climate adaptation. The project bridged the gap across the academic research, industry, and the farming communities to produce higher yielding crops and support sustainable farming. More than 100 commercial varieties have been developed through the wheat CAPs.

Led by University of California, Davis, the T-CAP team also includes Kansas State University, University of Nebraska, Colorado State University, Texas A&M University, North Carolina State University, Cornell University, and others. Triticeae is a taxonomic group of grasses that include many domesticated grains (e.g. wheat, barley, and rye). The scientists utilized markers to identify the gene variants that control the most desirable of the plant’s traits. They subsequently created the Triticeae Toolbox, which provides important information to plant breeders so they can develop improved wheat and barley lines.

T-CAP varieties now represent about 15% of the wheat and 4% of the barley harvested in the U.S., with a production value of $1.8 billion and $61 million, respectively.

T-CAP supports partnerships by uniting the breeding and genetic research communities and encourages public-private collaboration. It integrated breeding efforts to avoid duplication, and funded 28 institutions. By developing new wheat and barley varieties for changing environments and advancing science to maximize productivity, T-CAP empowers wheat and barley breeders and growers and helps ensure the prosperity of American growers.

Retaking The Field Volume 5 “Retaking the Field Volume 5: Innovation to Profit” explores how federally funded agricultural research strengthens farmers and ranchers’ bottomline by reducing costs and risks, increasing profits, and laying the groundwork for new products and industries. With powerful examples from universities across the country, it describes how research can generate outsized economic benefits that extends for decades. View The Issue
Retaking the Field Volume 5: Innovation to Profit Click to download report

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