North Carolina Cooperative Extension Creates $300 million Economic Impact

At North Carolina State University, Cooperative Extension educators taught classes that empowered people to make better-informed decisions in communities across the state. Extension professionals and volunteers provided 13,000 educational programs to 1.9 million residents, improved the health and well-being of 115,000 North Carolinians through food and nutrition programs, prepared more than 263,000 youth through 4-H programs, and provided $300 million of economic impact to the state.    

Retaking The Field Volume 5 “Retaking the Field Volume 5: Innovation to Profit” explores how federally funded agricultural research strengthens farmers and ranchers’ bottomline by reducing costs and risks, increasing profits, and laying the groundwork for new products and industries. With powerful examples from universities across the country, it describes how research can generate outsized economic benefits that extends for decades. View The Issue
Retaking the Field Volume 5: Innovation to Profit Click to download report

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