University of Nebraska Nebraska Extension Tackles Extreme Weather

Nebraska has experienced five $1 billion severe storm events since 2010. University of Nebraska Extension educators are helping Nebraskans increase their knowledge and use of climate and weather information and resources through four focus areas: climate literacy, natural resource management, extreme weather resiliency, and scenario-based planning. The team hosted climate science presentations for more than 1,000 producers and crop consultants and held field-to-market workshops.

Retaking The Field Volume 5 “Retaking the Field Volume 5: Innovation to Profit” explores how federally funded agricultural research strengthens farmers and ranchers’ bottomline by reducing costs and risks, increasing profits, and laying the groundwork for new products and industries. With powerful examples from universities across the country, it describes how research can generate outsized economic benefits that extends for decades. View The Issue
Retaking the Field Volume 5: Innovation to Profit Click to download report

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Maximizing Biodegradable Mulch

Vegetable and fruit growers pay for a lot of plastic – $3.4 billion in worldwide sales in 2017. Farmers use plastic mulch to suppress weeds, retain moisture, prevent soil erosion, and increase yields. Disposal at the end of each growing season is a costly problem. Plastic mulches are stockpiled on farms, burned illegally, and/or transported to landfills. Conventional plastic mulch materials are not biodegradable and can persist in the soil for decades if not centuries. Residual pieces of plastic film remain in the soil, where they can form microplastics, damage soil, and may even enter the food chain.

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Sequencing Solutions: Revolutionizing Understanding of Antimicrobial Resistance with Genome Analysis

Antimicrobial resistant-microbes (AMRs) pose a serious threat to public health. AMRs are found in people, animals, food, and the environment. They spread from animals to people, and from person to person. To solve this problem, Dr. Paul Morley and his team are studying the genetic makeup of all of the organisms throughout the environments involved in animal (e.g. beef and dairy cattle) food production, not just one isolated bacteria at a time.

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