University of Missouri & University of Iowa Highlighting Human Health

Investments in agricultural research provide a boost to improve human health. With the sequencing of the swine (pig) genome, there are new opportunities to research with models that are extremely close to the human genome. The pig genome is of similar size, complexity, and chromosomal organization as the human genome and can be useful for human health studies.

USDA invested in the original research to map the swine genome. With NIH funding, scientists at the National Swine Resource and Research Center at University of Missouri, along with medical researchers from University of Iowa, are using the mapped swine genome to create swine models that are available to biomedical investigators. These models provide opportunities to develop cures for cystic fibrosis, lymphocytic leukemia, spina bifida, cardiovascular, and other diseases.  

Retaking The Field Volume 5 “Retaking the Field Volume 5: Innovation to Profit” explores how federally funded agricultural research strengthens farmers and ranchers’ bottomline by reducing costs and risks, increasing profits, and laying the groundwork for new products and industries. With powerful examples from universities across the country, it describes how research can generate outsized economic benefits that extends for decades. View The Issue
Retaking the Field Volume 5: Innovation to Profit Click to download report

More Stories from the community

Protecting People and Poultry

Salmonellosis is a disease passed from chickens infected with Salmonella bacteria to humans through their contaminated meat and eggs. It causes nearly 94 million infections with 155,000 deaths globally each year, and in the United States it is the leading food-borne illness and can lead to hospitalization and death.

Read More
Fast-tracking an Improved Wheat Harvest

Dubcovsky leads a collaboration of wheat-breeding labs throughout the U.S. whose work has made this acceleration possible. He and his colleagues have mapped out more than 90,000 genetic markers in wheat plants and linked them to increases in productivity, resistance to dangerous pathogens, and deeper root systems.

Read More
Thinking Tiny: Blocking Pathogenic Bacteria With Nanoengineered Surfaces

Foodborne illnesses can be caused by food coming in contact with bacteria on surfaces in food-processing plants, restaurants, and households. When enough bacteria congregate, they create a “biofilm” that glues them to the surface. Biofilms are impervious to normal cleaning detergents, making them difficult to remove from food-processing equipment.

Read More