02.20.2017

Join us at Congressional briefings on Retaking the Field, March 2nd

In collaboration with eleven partnering universities, the SoAR Foundation is pleased to announce that Retaking the Field: Strengthening the Science of Farm and Food Production will be released on March 2, 2017.  The report tells stories about exciting advances and innovative research in the animal and plant sciences from Cornell University, Iowa State University, Kansas State University, Michigan State University, North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University, Penn State University, Ohio State University, Texas A&M University, University of California - Davis, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.  This report is the second in the “Retaking the Field” series, which is part of SoAR’s broader education and advocacy to encourage additional federal support for food and agricultural research.

Please join us on March 2, 2017 for Congressional briefings on the report.

11:00 am – 12:00 pm: Senate, Russell Office Building 328A

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm: House, Longworth Office Building 1300

We are very pleased that the following researchers will be presenting:

  • Gary W. Felton, PhD, Professor and Department Head of Entomology, College of Agricultural Science, Penn State University
  • John M. McDowell, , PhD, Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science, Virginia Tech
  • Christopher M. Seabury, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Texas A&M University
  • Barbara Valent, PhD, University Distinguished Professor and Interdepartmental Genetics Program Chair, Kansas State University

More Stories from the community

The Hill Op-Ed: The Food Science Deficit – Romaine Lettuce is Just the Tip of the Iceberg

Today, farmers have figured out where to grow most varieties of lettuce at any time of the year. So when romaine was fingered as the source of an E. coli outbreak that sickened 43 people in 12 states, the federal government was able to roll back this blanket prohibition and limit the recall to produce from central California farms, where most of the romaine is grown at this time of year. But limitations in science prevent any further specificity.

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