02.20.2017

Join us at Congressional briefings on Retaking the Field, March 2nd

In collaboration with eleven partnering universities, the SoAR Foundation is pleased to announce that Retaking the Field: Strengthening the Science of Farm and Food Production will be released on March 2, 2017.  The report tells stories about exciting advances and innovative research in the animal and plant sciences from Cornell University, Iowa State University, Kansas State University, Michigan State University, North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University, Penn State University, Ohio State University, Texas A&M University, University of California - Davis, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.  This report is the second in the “Retaking the Field” series, which is part of SoAR’s broader education and advocacy to encourage additional federal support for food and agricultural research.

Please join us on March 2, 2017 for Congressional briefings on the report.

11:00 am – 12:00 pm: Senate, Russell Office Building 328A

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm: House, Longworth Office Building 1300

We are very pleased that the following researchers will be presenting:

  • Gary W. Felton, PhD, Professor and Department Head of Entomology, College of Agricultural Science, Penn State University
  • John M. McDowell, , PhD, Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science, Virginia Tech
  • Christopher M. Seabury, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Texas A&M University
  • Barbara Valent, PhD, University Distinguished Professor and Interdepartmental Genetics Program Chair, Kansas State University

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